How Data Science Has Changed Everyday Life for the Better

data science


Data science is the study of where information comes from, what it represents and how it can be turned into a valuable resource in the creation of business and IT strategies. Mining large amounts of structured and unstructured data to identify patterns can help an organization rein in costs, increase efficiencies, recognize new market opportunities and increase the organization’s competitive advantage. Some companies are hiring data scientists to help them turn raw data into information.
Data scientists must possess a combination of analytic, machine learning, data mining and statistical skills as well as experience with algorithms and coding.

Application of Data Science

Here’s how Data Science comes to our rescue in our everyday routine.

Recommender Systems

recommendation systems


Who can forget the suggestions about similar products on Amazon? They not only help you find relevant products from billions of products available with them, but also adds a lot to the user experience. The recommendations are made based on previous search results for a user.

Internet Search

internet search

Search engines make use of data science algorithms to provide the best search result for searched query in fraction of seconds. Considering the fact that, Google processes more than 20 petabytes of data everyday. Had there been no data science, Google wouldn’t have been the ‘Google’ we know today.

Healthcare

Today fitness trackers and apps already help people lead a life that is more active, eat healthier and control their weight – and this is only the beginning. Already such devices monitor heart rate, sleep patterns and other vital signs that can be interpreted to serve other healthcare purposes and provide a diagnosis. The best cure is prevention, and with big data science, everyone will be able to keep their health in check.

Logistics

Logistic companies like DHL, FedEx, UPS, Kuhne+Nagel have used data science to improve their operational efficiency. Using data science, these companies have discovered the best routes to ship, the best suited time to deliver, the best mode of transport to choose thus leading to cost efficiency, and many more to mention. Further more, the data that these companies generate using the GPS installed, provides them a lots of possibilities to explore using data science.
Airlines schedule flights, predict delays based on precise weather forecasts and estimate the number of seats they are going to need for each direction based on seasonal fluctuations, competitors’ actions, latest social trends or political events. There are also mechanisms that allow them to decide on the class of planes they will need to purchase in the future.

Image Recognition

Today face recognition is not that big a deal. It offers you to tag your friends on social media photos; it enables goofy masks in Snapchat, Instagram and webcam programs. Lots of fun and nothing substantially useful. However, this can be a powerful tool of law enforcement in the future. Already this feature is making its way into security systems – in flagship models of modern smartphone, you may choose face recognition to unlock your device. In future, it can be used to identify suspects and find missing persons.

Data science and Python

Why Python is usful for Data Science? Python is a powerful, flexible, open source language that is easy to learn, easy to use, and has powerful libraries for data manipulation and analysis. Its simple syntax is very accessible to programming novices, and will look familiar to anyone with experience in Matlab, C/C++, Java, or Visual Basic. Python has a unique combination of being both a capable general-purpose programming language as well as being easy to use for analytical and quantitative computing.
python and data science
Python is easy for analysts to learn and use, but powerful enough to tackle even the most difficult problems in virtually any domain. It integrates well with existing IT infrastructure, and is very platform independent. Among modern languages, its agility and the productivity of Python-based solutions is legendary. Companies of all sizes and in all areas — from the biggest investment banks to the smallest social/mobile web app startups — are using Python to run their business and manage their data.

Because of growing importance and scope of data science, many are opting for business analytics and data science certification courses. Data Science is changing the world, and if you are passionate about this fascinating discipline, then this is the time to enroll yourself in a data science course.

Want to learn Python Programming? 

Must read: top 10 Android stories

This week we reviewed the Razer Phone and BlackBerry Motion, talked to Google about the Google Home Mini, crowned a winner in our Best of Android competition. Here’s the news of the week!


What’s the best Android smartphone on the market? Head to our Best of Android 2017 articles below to find out:

  • Best of Android 2017 – Display
  • Best of Android 2017 – Audio
  • Best of Android 2017 – Which camera looks the best? (camera shootout)
  • Best of Android 2017 – Performance
  • Best of Android 2017 – Which camera is technically the best? (technical comparison)
  • Best of Android 2017 – Battery
  • Best of Android 2017 – User experience
  • The Phone of The Year 2017 is…

Who wants to win a ZTE Axon M?

The ZTE Axon M takes gaming and productivity to the next level. Here’s how you can win one!

10 Android stories we handpicked for you

Razer Phone review Is Razer’s first smartphone a smart buy for everyone, or only for mobile gamers? Find out in our full Razer Phone review!


Google’s plan to take over the home starts with Google Home Mini We talk to Selena Salazar, product manager for Google Home Mini, about Google’s vision for the smart home, Assistant-powered refrigerators, and more.


BlackBerry Motion review: a KEYone without the keyboard Does a BlackBerry without a physical keyboard still feel like a BlackBerry or does it just turn into your average Android phone?


This is the OnePlus 5T Star Wars Edition With the release of much-anticipated Star Wars: The Last Jedi, OnePlus has announced the launch of a Star Wars-branded limited edition of the OnePlus 5T.


Why an (unofficial) anti-Amazon alliance is a very good thing Amazon has become the middle-man of everything, and are the leader of tech’s Big Four companies, over Apple, Google, and Facebook. But the fightback is on.


Which smartphones retain their resale value the best? If you’re looking to swap your flagship smartphone for a new one this year, here’s a list of the handsets with the best resale value.


Google Pixel 2 or Pixel 2 XL: which should you buy? Google released two different sizes of Pixel phones this year. Which should you buy— the Google Pixel 2 or Pixel 2 XL?


The notch is coming to a smartphone near you Get ready to see a lot of iPhone-style notches on future Android smartphones, as the design is going to be used on upcoming bezel-free displays.


How to use AR Stickers on the Google Pixel or Pixel 2 Do you have a Google Pixel or Pixel 2? If so, you can now use AR Stickers! Here’s everything you need to know.


Can the Snapdragon 845 give VR a shot in the arm? The new Qualcomm Snapdragon 845 boasts a number of improvements for virtual reality applications, but is that enough to reinvigorate the market?


Don’t miss these videos

Watch more Android videos on our YouTube channel.

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  • Zooper Widget has mysteriously disappeared from the Play Store
  • Essential Phone will gain double tap to wake, EIS, and more features in future updates
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  • Google releases two new experimental photography apps for Android
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Unbelievable Censorship: Trump Bans CDC from Using These 7 Words

The forbidden words include “vulnerable,” “diversity,” and “science-based.”

Donald Trump’s administration has reportedly banned the Center for Disease Control from using seven words and phrases, including “science-based” and “transgender,” in documents it is working on for next year’s budget.

 

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The Right-Wing Backlash Against #MeToo Is Coming Sooner Than You Think

Conservatives are angry and scared. This can only end badly.

At first blush, the story about Texas associate deputy attorney general Andrew Leonie, who resigned hastily after making ugly comments about the #MeToo movement on Facebook, seems like another sign of a sea change happening in the United States when it comes to sexism. But for me, it only adds to the growing sense of dread that another shoe is lifting and that the big drop is coming soon, and it’s going to be a bad one.

Sexists are getting angry. They’re getting scared. They’re starting to lash out. I worry that it’s just a matter of time before some of their punches start landing.

Leonie, who identified as a man of “Christian faith” and father to “great kids” on his Facebook page, also took to Facebook at 2:40 a.m. on a Wednesday morning and wrote, “Aren’t you also tired of all the pathetic ‘me too’ victim claims? If every woman is a ‘victim,’ so is every man. If everyone is a victim, no one is. Victim means nothing anymore.”

It’s tempting to believe that a man who was making more than $150,000 a year representing the great state of Texas in court is merely another casualty who failed to follow the rule that there’s nothing worth saying on social media between the hours of midnight and 6 a.m. But, as Noor Al-Sibai of Raw Story noted, Leonie had a habit of saying gross things on social media, including posting a cartoon calling the Women’s March protesters “cunts.”

Leonie was shown the door with haste, even though he’s in Texas and works for Attorney General Ken Paxton, a profoundly misogynistic politician who whined that Texas would become a “sanctuary state for abortions” if undocumented immigrants were legally allowed to terminate unwanted pregnancies.

Despite many fears to the contrary, it does seem that the #MeToo movement is affecting Republican careers. Rep. Trent Franks, R-Ariz., was pushed out after it was discovered that he tried to pay female aides to have babies for him. Rep. Blake Farenthold, R-Texas, has agreed not to run again, and is getting increasing coverage for his alleged harassment of employees. Alabama Republican Roy Moore lost his Senate bid after multiple allegations that he chased high school girls in his 30s came out. Now this Texas lawyer has been pushed out simply for saying gross things about sexual harassment victims.

It’s heartening, but let’s be clear: The only reason this is happening is that conservatives haven’t yet figured out a narrative they can use to derail the #MeToo movement. Part of the problem is that for decades, conservatives have argued against feminism by embracing the “chivalry” narrative, framing women as inherently weaker and in need of male protection. So while they won’t accept feminist arguments about sexual harassment being a matter of sex discrimination, they can’t help but admit that there’s no part of “protecting women like delicate flowers” that involves groping, making lewd and bullying comments, or forcing yourself on women.

That also suggests that if conservatives do find some way to derail the #MeToo movement — which, unlike women themselves, is indeed a delicate flower that could easily be destroyed — they are going to take it.

Leonie’s Facebook post — which, in what I’m sure was a great coincidence, was posted about 40 minutes after the bars close in Austin, Texas — captures that grasping desire to come up with some reason, any reason, to tell all those women to sit down and shut up already about how they don’t like being sexually harassed and abused. It’s a Federalist piece by D.C. McAllister, who dumps a few thousand words attacking a straw man, by arguing, without a shred of evidence, that feminists are opposed to consensual flirting.

“Here’s a little secret we have to say out loud,” she writes. “Women love the sexual interplay they experience with men, and they relish men desiring their beauty.”

(I’m convinced every Federalist writer is out to personally dial down the amount of sex people are having, by the power of their overwrought prose alone. Those two sentences are like a pair of twin beds, but in writing.)

There’s a desperation here, both from McAllister in trying to air out this tedious “feminists are prudes” argument and from Leonie, posting it at the 2:40 a.m. Absolutely no one believes that women who encounter powerful men masturbating at them, groping them, or locking them in rooms are flattered by the attention.

These old arguments and strategies aren’t working, which shows the power that stories have to disrupt false stereotypes and narratives. But if there’s one thing the past couple years have shown, it’s that reactionaries are surprisingly flexible about their strategies. And they’re experimenting, tossing out new ideas about how to end #MeToo.

The first shot, of course, was outing Sen. Al Franken as a serial groper, in an effort to create the narrative that everyone does it so no one should be held accountable. That failed, because Democrats finally saw through it and pushed Franken out. The second attempt was to deliberately make false accusations, with James O’Keefe trying to sell a false accusation against Roy Moore and someone, likely Mike Cernovich, falsifying a document accusing Sen. Chuck Schumer of harassment. The obvious idea there is that by getting some fake accusations into the bloodstream, they can “prove” that fake accusations are all around us and cast doubt on the real ones. Luckily, that failed.

But all this shows that conservatives aren’t going to concede this without a massive fight. Conservatives grasp, even if many liberals don’t, that we’re on the verge of a true social breakthrough. People are beginning to realize it’s not enough to kick a few gross men out, but that this is a systemic problem, that women really are disempowered, that men really do have unfair advantages, and that something really needs to happen to change that.

All of these incidents demonstrate, in other words, that the widespread opinion on the right is that #MeToo is a menace, that it needs to be ended and that the only question right now is how to do it. Their first efforts have failed, but mark my words: They’re going to keep trying. They have money and numbers to keep coming up with random ideas and testing them on the public. It’s just a matter of time until they find a strategy that sticks.

 

 

 

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I’m shocked, SHOCKED, that racism is going on here!

When viewed from over here in Europe, American politics sometimes appear a bit weird. Last week it was weirder than usual. President Trump flip-flopped on his condemnation of white supremacists and racists, and there was a huge outcry about how he finally failed to take a strong verbal stand against racism. That left me very much confused! I had been under the impression that as a candidate Trump had run on a platform of pretty open racism and hate of foreigners, especially Mexicans and Muslims. I had been under the impression that a large part of the American electorate, somewhere between 30% and 50%, believed that foreigners were to be blamed for many American problems, and that an anti-foreigner “America first” policy would improve things. In short, I thought that once you stripped off the veneer of political correctness, the policies of xenophobia and racism were pretty much American mainstream. So how come everybody is so outraged if a president says what we all know that he is thinking?

What is so weird about political correctness is that people are okay with *actions* that directly target a specific race or religion, like building a wall towards Mexico, or a Muslim travel ban. But *speech* which contains racial or religious or gender discrimination is unacceptable? I can’t help but wonder whether it wouldn’t be a lot saner to do it the other way around: Have an open discussion about the fears and prejudices people have towards other races, religions, genders, or sexual orientations, but refrain from actually persecuting people for having a different race, religion, or sexual orientation. There is strong scientific evidence that a certain degree of xenophobia is something hard-wired into the parts of our brains from an earlier evolutionary period, and overcoming xenophobia means teaching the newer parts of the brain to override those outdated instincts. Prohibiting people from talking about those instinctive feelings isn’t really helpful in that respect, because it doesn’t make those feelings go away.

Idle Champions of the Forgotten Realms on iOS

When an alpha test comes with specific instructions not to share screen shots and videos, I read the absence of specific instructions on other forms of communication as them being allowed. So I think I can reveal that since yesterday I am in an alpha test of Idle Champions of the Forgotten Realms for mobile devices, which in my case specifically is on an iPad.

I got into that alpha via a link that appeared while I was playing the game on my PC. That is a pretty safe way to select your alpha testers, as existing players will be able to concentrate on bugs or differences to the PC version. Up to now I only found one minor issue, and when I reported it I got a non-automated mail back within minutes. Nice! I’m not a huge fan of the “stress test” type of beta tests where the input of the testers isn’t even wanted.

The good news is that the game on the iPad runs as smoothly as on the PC, and appears to be a straight port of the current PC version. The bad news is that the game on the iPad thus has exactly the same rules as the PC version. And those rules push people to let the game run 24/7, because you farm much more gold online than offline. That helped Codename Entertainment get their game in the “top 100 most played Steam games” category, which is somewhat misleading because you can’t compare an idle game left running with a game that only does something when you are at the controls. And while letting your PC run 24/7 is still feasible (I just turn the screen off), it is a lot more difficult to do that on a tablet. You need to connect the tablet to a charger, for one thing. And while on the PC the game runs perfectly in the background while you do something else in the foreground, the mobile version only works when it is the foreground, thus prohibiting other use for your tablet.

I would be okay if the “auto progress ON” function only worked when online. But I think that while not progressing, the game should gather gold online and offline at a comparable rate. Apparently there is a change coming in some future patch, but I do think the game needs that change to be viable on a mobile platform.

I finished The Legend of Zelda – Breath of the Wild

Of course you can’t actually finish an open world game. Even if you used the game’s internal 100% completion counter, that still doesn’t cover all the content there is. So when I say I “finished” the game, I’m using the goals that I set for myself: Do all 120 shrines and kill the end boss to get to the closing credits. I did a lot of other content, but for example not all Korok seeds, of which there are far more than you actually need.

I still think Zelda – Breath of the Wild is one of the greatest games ever. I really liked all the discoveries, the open world without invisible walls made possible by the ability to climb vertical surfaces, and the numerous puzzles everywhere. I would have preferred a less action-centric combat system, but I appreciated that it wasn’t so hard that I would have needed more skills than I have in button-mashing. My biggest gripe with the game is that the sensor you get at some point to find shrines or resources you have previously photographed is terribly imprecise and unclear. Some of the shrines I could only find by looking them up on the internet, for example because they were in a cave half way up on a cliff face hidden behind a breakable wall, with no quest giving you any hint that they were there. But then you don’t actually need all 120 shrines to finish the game, so that is hardly a big problem.

My biggest mistake in this playthrough was keeping all my gems. Yes, there is a quest rather late in the game where you can sell gems for more money than usual. And yes, you can use some gems to upgrade some armor. But the gem-selling quest pays only like 10% extra, and you don’t really need to upgrade all your armor to maximum. I only upgraded the ancient armor to maximum, which both gives very good defense and even adds to offense when using ancient or guardian weapons. Most other armor sets need only to be upgraded twice to get the added set bonus. The armor class is mostly irrelevant for armor that you wear for other bonuses, e.g. for faster climbing or swimming. If I had sold all gems found earlier, I would have spent less hours farming materials which I only used to make elixirs which I then sold.

Ending the game produces an automatically saved game marked with a star, which has some added features like the completion counter I mentioned. Besides that some DLC content unlocks only after having done the four divine beasts, so I haven’t done that yet. However I’m not yet convinced that this DLC content is worth doing, as a lot of it appears to be somewhat grindy in nature, like the gauntlet of 45 levels of the Trial of the Sword. I think I will at least try some of that stuff before stopping to play. And I do consider that I might want to play the game again from the start after a while. However I won’t play in Master Mode, because I tried that and it just made combat incredibly hard, which isn’t what I am looking for.

I don’t regret having bought a Switch to play Zelda, but now it might be time to give some other Switch games a chance.

A ‘Security Robot’ for the Homeless Has Already Been Tried—It Didn’t Go Well

The 400lb machine that once patrolled outside the San Francisco SPCA prompted a backlash, as some argued its real mission was to drive people away.

To some who are homeless, San Francisco’s latest security robot was a rolling friend on five wheels that they called “R2-D2 Two”. To others living in tents within the droid’s radius, it was the “anti-homeless robot”.

For a month, the 400lb, bullet-shaped bot patrolled outside the not-for-profit San Francisco SPCA animal shelter, rolling around the organization’s parking lots and sidewalks, capturing security video and reading up to 300 license plates per minute. Homeless people who pitched their tents in an alleyway nearby complained they felt the beeping, whirring droid’s job was to run them off.

“We called it the anti-homeless robot,” said John Alvarado, who was one of numerous people camping next to the animal shelter when the robot arrived. He said he quickly decided to move his tent half a block away: “I guess that was the reason for the robot.”

Officials of both the SF SPCA and Knightscope, who rented the robot to the shelter, denied that the intention was to dislodge homeless encampments.

“The SPCA has the right to protect its property, employees and visitors, and Knightscope is dedicated to helping them achieve this goal,” Knightscope said in a statement.

SF SPCA staff members said the facility had been plagued with break-ins, staff members had been harassed as they went to the parking lot and sidewalks were littered with hypodermic needles. Jennifer Scarlett, the SF SPCA president, said in a release that her organization “was exploring the use of a robot to prevent additional burglaries at our facility and to deter other crimes that frequently occur on our campus – like car break-ins, harassment, vandalism, and graffiti – not to disrupt homeless people”.

But after complaints about the program were shared widely on social media, the organization quickly admitted it had made a mistake in its choice of security guards – and fired the robot.

“Since this story has gone viral, we’ve received hundreds of messages inciting violence and vandalism against our facility, and encouraging people to take retribution,” said Scarlett, noting that their campus had since been vandalized twice. “We are taking this opportunity to reflect on the ‘teachable moment’.”

Some of the homeless people who crossed paths with the white security robot, which bore images of dogs and cats, as it patrolled outside of San Francisco SPCA this month thought it was a cute and a positive addition to the area.

TJ Thornton, whose tent is still pitched across the street from the shelter’s parking lot, nicknamed the bot “R2-D2 Two”. He liked how the machine made little whistling sounds as it moved along the sidewalk and how it would even say “hello” if you walked past it.

Thornton said he thought the bot had a positive influence on the neighborhood and relieved the pressure on local homeless people to always keep an eye on cars parked nearby. “People living on the streets actually watch out for the cars. If anyone does anything stupid, like breaking into cars, it reflects on us.”

Others saw the robot as Big Brother, surveilling their every move with video cameras. “That SPCA robot was the bane of our existence,” said Lexi Evans, 26, who has been living on San Francisco’s streets for 13 years. “It was driving us crazy.”

She said her group of friends had a tent encampment behind the SPCA. When they first saw the robot looking at them, they found it creepy. Then they noticed its white light flashing and thought it was recording their every move on video. Later they observed police officers coming to interact with the robot and wondered whether it was feeding information to law enforcement.

“We started feeling like this thing was surveilling us for the police,” said Evans, whose whole tent encampment has now moved around the block outside another business. “That’s officially invasion of privacy. That’s uncool.”

Evans said that once, someone became so angry with the thing that they knocked it over. The robot made a “whee-ooh wah” sound.

In another instance, somebody “put a tarp over it, knocked it over and put barbecue sauce on all the sensors”, Scarlett, the SPCA president, told the San Francisco Business Times.

Trouble really started for the robot last week, when the city issued an order for it to stay off the public sidewalk or face a daily penalty of up to $1,000 for operating in the public right of way without a permit. Then the story hit the internet, with Scarlett telling the Business Times that “from a walking standpoint, I find the robot much easier to navigate than an encampment”.

But by Friday, SF SPCA was apologizing for having brought in the machine.

“We regret that our words were ill-chosen. They did not properly convey the pilot program’s intent and they inaccurately reflected our values,” said Scarlett. “We are a nonprofit that is extremely sensitive to the issues of homelessness.”

Knightscope’s robots have gotten into trouble in other cities. Last year, a similar robot allegedly ran over a 16-month-old toddler at the Stanford Shopping Center in the town of Palo Alto, causing minor injuries. Another Knightscope security robot became famous on social media for drowning itself in the fountain of the Washington DC office complex it was policing.

“I already miss it,” said Danica Dito, who works in the SPCA administrative offices. “Just the fact that it rolled around discouraged crime.”

 

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Who Said It: A Republican Congressman or a Classic Christmas Villain? Take the Quiz

Can you tell the difference between Paul Ryan and Ebenezer Scrooge?

There’s something familiar about the way the GOP talks about the poor. If you’ve been paying close attention to Republicans in the House and Senate, they may strike you as being eerily reminiscent of other curmudgeons we normally hear from this time of year—infamous villains like Ebenezer Scrooge from Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol.” Between defenses of their ruthless attempts to dismantle the Affordable Care Act and their ludicrous justifications for passing a bill that slashes taxes for the rich while hiking costs for the poor and middle classes, Republican politicians are sounding more and more like the grumpy, selfish antagonists from our favorite stories of the season.

Don’t believe it? Take this quiz to see if you can tell the difference between real people and fictional characters. Check your answers at the bottom.

When it comes to the poor, Mitch McConnell’s views are virtually the same as Mr. Potter’s from “It’s a Wonderful Life.”

Photo Credit: Liberty Films (Potter, left); Wikimedia Commons (McConnell, right)

1. “I am an old man and most people hate me. But I don’t like them either, so that makes it all even.”

a) Mitch McConnell

b) Orrin Hatch

c) Mr. Potter (It’s a Wonderful Life

2. “We don’t want to turn the safety net into a hammock that lulls able-bodied people into complacency and dependence.”

a) Paul Ryan

b) Ebenezer Scrooge

c) Mitch McConnell

3. “Are you running a business or a charity ward? Not with my money!”

a) Paul Ryan

b) Mr. Potter

c) Sen. Chuck Grassley

4. “I think not having the estate tax recognizes the people that are investing as opposed to those that are just spending every darn penny they have, whether it’s on booze or women or movies.”

a) Sen. Chuck Grassley

b) The Grinch

c) Mr. Potter

5. “Oh, bleeding hearts of the world, unite!”

a) The Grinch

b) Ebenezer Scrooge

c) Orrin Hatch

6. “Are there no prisons? And the union workhouses, are they still in operation? Those who are badly off must go there.”

a) Mitch McConnell

b) Ebenezer Scrooge

c) The Grinch

7. “I have a rough time wanting to spend billions and billions and trillions of dollars to help people who won’t help themselves, won’t lift a finger, and expect the federal government to do everything.”

a) Mr. Potter

b) Paul Ryan

c) Orrin Hatch

8. “Those people who lead good lives, they’re healthy, they’ve done the things to keep their bodies healthy. And right now, those are the people who have done things the right way that are seeing their costs skyrocketing.”

a) Mr. Potter

b) Mo Brooks, Alabama congressman

c) Ebenezer Scrooge

9. “We have got this tailspin of culture, in our inner cities in particular, of men not working and just generations of men not even thinking about working or learning to value the culture of work, so there is a real culture problem here that has to be dealt with.”

a) The Grinch

b) Ebenezer Scrooge

c) Paul Ryan 

10. “Uh-huh. You see, if you shoot pool with some employee here, you can come and borrow money. What does that get us? A discontented, lazy rabble instead of a thrifty working class.”

a) Chuck Grassley

b) Paul Ryan

c) Mr. Potter 

Key: 1:C, 2:A, 3:B, 4:A, 5:A, 6:B, 7:C, 8:B, 9:C, 10:C

How to install and configure TOMCAT server with Eclipse?

Download and Install Tomcat

For Windows
  1. Go to http://tomcat.apache.org ⇒ Under “Tomcat 8.5.{xx} Released” (where {xx} is the latest upgrade number) ⇒ Downloads ⇒ Under “8.5.{xx}” ⇒ Binary Distributions ⇒ Core ⇒ “ZIP” package (e.g., “apache-tomcat-8.5.{xx}.zip“, about 9 MB).
  2. Create your project directory, say “d:myProject” or “c:myProject“. UNZIP the downloaded file into your project directory. Tomcat will be unzipped into the directory “d:myProjectapache-tomcat-8.0.{xx}“.
  3. For ease of use, we shall shorten and rename this directory to “d:myProjecttomcat“.
Take note of Your Tomcat Installed Directory. Hereafter, I shall refer to the Tomcat installed directory as.
For Mac OS
  1. Go to http://tomcat.apache.org ⇒ Under “Tomcat 8.5.{xx} Released” (where {xx} is the latest upgrade number) ⇒ Downloads ⇒ Under “8.5.{xx}”⇒ Binary distribution ⇒ Core ⇒ “tar.gz” package (e.g., “apache-tomcat-8.0.{xx}.tar.gz“, about 9 MB).
  2. To install Tomcat:
    1. Goto “~/Downloads“, double-click the downloaded tarball (e.g., “apache-tomcat-8.0.{xx}.tar.gz“) to expand it into a folder (e.g., “apache-tomcat-8.0.{xx}“).
    2. Move the extracted folder (e.g., “apache-tomcat-8.0.{xx}“) to “/Applications“.
    3. For ease of use, we shall shorten and rename this folder to “tomcat”.
Take note of Your Tomcat Installed Directory. Hereafter, I shall refer to the Tomcat installed directory as .

For academic learning, I recommend “zip” (or “tar.gz”) version, as you could simply delete the entire directory when Tomcat is no longer needed (without running any un-installer). You are free to move or rename the Tomcat’s installed directory. You can install (unzip) multiple copies of Tomcat in the same machine. For production, it is easier to use the installer to properly configure the Tomcat.

Create an Environment Variable JAVA_HOME

(For Windows)
You need to create an environment variable called “JAVA_HOME” and set it to your JDK installed directory.
  1. First, find your JDK installed directory. The default is “c:Program FilesJavajdk1.8.0_{xx}“, where {xx} is the upgrade number. Take note of your JDK installed directory.
  2. To set the environment variable JAVA_HOME in Windows 7/8/10: Start “Control Panel” ⇒ System and Security (Optional) ⇒ System ⇒ Advanced system settings ⇒ Switch to “Advanced” tab ⇒ Environment Variables ⇒ System Variables ⇒ “New” ⇒ In “Variable Name”, enter “JAVA_HOME” ⇒ In “Variable Value”, enter your JDK installed directory as noted in Step 1.
  3. To verify, RE-START a CMD shell (restart needed to refresh the environment) and issue:
    SET JAVA_HOME
    JAVA_HOME=c:Program FilesJavajdk1.8.0_{xx}

How to configure tomcat server in Eclipse IDE?

In Eclipse IDE, go to menu Window > Preferences. Then expand the Server > Runtime Environments node in the Preferences dialog:

Click Add… to add a new server runtime environment. In the New Server Runtime Environment dialog, select Apache > Apache Tomcat v x.x  and check the option Create a new local server:

Click Next. In the next screen, click the Browse button to specify the existing installation directory of Tomcat on your computer:

Click Finish, the selected Tomcat installation is added to the list of server runtime environments, as shown below:

Click OK to close the Preferences dialog, the new server runtime is added to the Servers view:

You can now drag and drop a project into this server in order to deploy and run the project.
NOTE: If you don’t see the Servers view, you can show it by go to the menu Window > Show View > Others…, then look for Servers.

Writing First Servlet:

1. Create Dynamic Web Project

To create a Servlet we need to create a new ‘Dynamic Web project’ which can be done in three ways,

  • Right click on Project Explorer -> New -> Dynamic Web Project
  • File menu -> New -> Dynamic Web Project
  • Click on the down arrow on New icon on toolbar -> Dynamic Web Project

 Click “Next” button.Click “Next” button.

Check ‘Generate web.xml deployment descriptor’ checkbox and click “Finish” button and Eclipse IDE will generate the web project automatically as shown below

2. Create Servlet Class

Select from the menu File –> New –> Servlet.

Write “com.srccodes.example” in the ‘Java Package’ field and “HelloWorld” in the ‘Class Name’ field. Click ‘Next’ button.

We can specify deployment descriptor (web.xml) specific information in the following screen. Just keep every thing as it is for the time being. Click “Next” button.

Click ‘Next’ button.Click ‘Next’ button.
Eclipse will generate a Servlet class based on the configuration / input we provided in the previous steps.
3. Write Custom Code

Add your code inside ‘doGet’ method. ‘setContentType’ method of HttpServletResponse sets content type of the response to ‘text/html’ which is the standard MIME content type for Html pages. ‘getWriter’ method of the response object returns a PrintWriter object. This will be used to print our “Hello World!” string in the browser.
Edit the generated ‘HelloWorld.java’ as per the following code.

File: HelloWorld.java

package com.srccodes.example;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.PrintWriter;
import javax.servlet.ServletException;
import javax.servlet.annotation.WebServlet;
import javax.servlet.http.HttpServlet;
import javax.servlet.http.HttpServletRequest;
import javax.servlet.http.HttpServletResponse;
/**
 * Servlet implementation class HelloWorld
 */
@WebServlet(“/HelloWorld”)
public class HelloWorld extends HttpServlet {
    private static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;
        
    /**
     * @see HttpServlet#HttpServlet()
     */
    public HelloWorld() {
        super();
        // TODO Auto-generated constructor stub
    }
    /**
     * @see HttpServlet#doGet(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response)
     */
    protected void doGet(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response) throws ServletException, IOException {
        response.setContentType(“text/html”);
        PrintWriter printWriter  = response.getWriter();
        printWriter.println(“

Hello World!

“);

    }
    /**
     * @see HttpServlet#doPost(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response)
     */
    protected void doPost(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response) throws ServletException, IOException {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
    }
}

4. Run Your Servlet Code

Right click on the project ‘HelloWorldServlet’ and select from context menu ‘Run As’ –> ‘Run on Server’.
Select the existing tomcat server.
Click “Finish” button. HelloWorldServlet web application will be deployed in the tomcat web server.
6. Browser Output

Eclipse will open a browser and your server side code will print ‘Hello World!’ in the browser.